Expansive Justice

“Human existence cannot be silent, nor can it be nourished by false words, but only by true words, with which men and women transform their world...Once named, the world in its turn reappears to the namers as a problem and requires of them a new naming. Human beings are not built in silence, but in word, in work, in action-reflection. But while to say the true word is to transform the world, saying that word is not the privilege of some few persons, but the right of everyone. Consequently, no one can say a true word alone – nor can she say it for another, in a prescriptive act which robs others of their words." - Paulo Freire

Genderfluid, migrant, Afro-Latinx, activist….
Femme-identified, displaced, anti-blackness, never enough... 

I was raised in a home with strong moral and religious values that embodied my family to engage in the daily service of others. My earliest memories are of my father bringing me to shelters to play my violin for folks experiencing homelessness and fighting addictions, having vigilias (vigils) that felt more like sleepovers in the church and being present for whatever our community needed whether that was serving the tenants in our building or our neighbors across oceans. You just did your best to show up and serve. 

Genderfluid, migrant, Afro-Latinx, activist….
Femme-identified, displaced, anti-blackness, never enough... 

I was also raised in a home where being a girl had very definite rules, roles and expectations - my favorite being “lady’s should never aimlessly roam the streets”. By 12 my family, culture, and sense of belonging had been removed. I realized my hair which showed my “hint” of blackness was something that every Dominican, or any woman of the diaspora, had to deny because to be considered beautiful was to be properly colonized (i.e. passing as white). 

Expansive. Human. Enough.

By 23, I had traveled to the site where millions of  slaves were shipped for sale during the Transatlantic Slave Trade. I started to come to terms with what justice meant for my African, Indigenous and even European heritage. I started coming to terms with my gender and sexuality and how ill-defined they were all throughout my upbringing and committed myself to aligning my thoughts and behaviors towards what I knew to be more true. I began accepting that showing up for others was all I needed to do and that showing up for myself was just as important too. 


As we recommit ourselves to Love and Justice, I urge you to explore your inner and outer worlds. Name it, so you can change it. Seek to understand where things are so you start the journey of aligning yourself and your world to where you’d like things to be. 

Let’s let our justice be as expansive as our identities and as expansive as our love.